Tritons

Fast Eddie

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wilkey113 said:
Thanks Fast Eddie,
I've looked at Discovolante and Andy Molnar. I've looked at all the replica brakes actually, and most of them are top notch. My biggest hang up, is that I'm a bit of a stickler for original parts. I'd prefer to find the old original bits, and don't mind spending the money. I'm not racing the bike, and even though I'll be riding it regularly on the road, I think a drum brake will be plenty sufficient for my needs and the fact that I'm not out to be some road racer tough guy.
I know a disk works better, I know a double disc works better yet, and then putting a disc on the back is even better yet. But it's a late 1950's - early 1960's motorcycle, so I prefer the correct looking bits. Lots of this stuff starts to get too modern for me, and at some point, with too many upgrades, I might as well get myself a Mazda Miata, put the top down and wear a helmet. Joking of course...

My project is a long term build, and I've been at it regularly for 3 1/2 straight years. I've still got time before it's done, so I can wait and keep looking for the right bits. If, by the time it's ready, if the brakes are all that's holding it up, then I'll pop for one of Andy Molnar's 4LS Manx brakes. But I'm still holding out for something original.

Appreciate all the info, and if I can figure out a reasonable way to ring Dave Degens, then I'll certainly give him a call.
Jeff

Hey Jeff, check this out: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/ROBINSON-Repl ... 338a5455e0
 
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Fast Eddie,
Appreciate the link. I've seen the replica Robinson before, and I like them, but the thing I don't like is that the replica is a 36 hole hub, rather than 40 hole like the original. Not sure why they made them that way, but it seems like a big miss on a key detail.
Jeff
 

Fast Eddie

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wilkey113 said:
Fast Eddie,
Appreciate the link. I've seen the replica Robinson before, and I like them, but the thing I don't like is that the replica is a 36 hole hub, rather than 40 hole like the original. Not sure why they made them that way, but it seems like a big miss on a key detail.
Jeff

Come on Jeff, get with the program... thats a weight saving of 4 spokes and 4 nipples... And it's unsprung weight...!
 
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Hahahaha
I'll take an original or at least a faithful reproduction over a replica with bad details, any day.
The small Italian bikes had 36 spokes, so I'm not sure how they got that detail wrong on this Robinson.
 
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Hi, I'm trying to get a cable made up for my Atlas to use
A John Tickle front brake plate. Anyone know the
Thread size for the adjuster that screws into the
Lug on the plate? Thanks, Andy
 
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Andy,
My John Tickle brake takes the standard Norton adjuster. 5/16", and same thread as the SLS Norton brake plate. Any standard Dominator adjuster should do the trick for you. I can't recall the exact TPI, but it is interchangeable with the standard Norton adjuster.
Jeff
 

Dommie Nator

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"Bitsas" the lot of them.....no I do sort of like them really. Got to be pre-unit for me though as not only do the unit ones look wrong the swing arm spindle to final drive sprocket distance is too far out. Tin hat on....."incoming"
 
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Both of your bikes are lovely . I had a 61 slimline with a 750 unit 5speed mill and just loved it. No two Tritons are ever the same. By definition it's a Norton featherbed frame with a Triumph mill. I actually like the look of the unit engine better when viewed from the primary side. One day I'll build another Triton. As I still have sellers remorse from selling my first one. Thanks for sharing the pics of your bikes......PhillySkip

http://i136.photobucket.com/albums/q166 ... 040419.jpg
 
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Andy the Tickle brakes are 5/16" BSF thread which from memory is 22TPI
 
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Those are cracking bikes! I dont think you have many 63 bonnies to worry about! :lol:





Fletch said:
Dave- you are spot on regarding your description; the rear shocks are Works, the tires are Avons 100/90/18 F and 120/80/18 R, and it is a pre-unit 650cc engine. I am waiting on the fellow who I got it from to give me the specs on the engine and documentation of the overall project. He was a former Triumph racer and spent quite a bit of time on the finishing details. I love the Chronometric gauges- too cool in action. It is indeed the perfect fair weather, Saturday morning scoot. Great for keeping the neighbors on edge :wink:

The other side:
Tritons001_zps703680a7.jpg


Acotrel- thanks for your input, but with all due respect, I am no longer interested in your opinion.
 
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This was my last Triton. Initially built for BHR, but replaced by an 8 valve job. Its 840cc with Norton crank and rods and a host of other stuff. One-off frame; it looks like a featherbed but its shorter and lower... and lighter... look how the unit motor 'fills' the frame. It was a quick bike but a rod let go. When the 8 valve was built, this was rebuilt as a road bike. Then I sold it. It was in Germany last I heard.
 
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Hi Nigel,
here it is, your Dresda Triton! Unfortunately I have not used it as a racer until today. I occasionally take part in historic races with my 1938 Triumph-Racer. This Triton is a pleasure and very fast on the road. I hope I did everything right, because I have no experience to write something in forums.
 

Fast Eddie

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Wow, fantastic, I have often wondered where she ended up, and now I see she is in good hands.

I see you have fitted raised clip ons and Mikuni carbs which is a very wise choice. When I sold the bike, I sold it on the basis that I’d finish the engine to the buyers requirements. Try as I did to advise him on softer cams, lower CR, and carbs with a tickover, he insisted on full race cams, high CR and smoothbore carbs!

Am I correct in thinking you have changed the barrels too?

Here are some action photos of it in its former life. I can’t recall where the top pic was taken or when, but I think it may have been Snetterton.

The bottom pic is Cadwell Park, probably ‘98 and I had a fantastic battle with one of my arch rivals Jim Overberry on his 8 valve Rickman Mettise.

Good days. No, great days! The leathers look like they were a bit looser then too...!

5F0B1A47-91B0-452D-9B1C-083E5614D6FA.jpeg
118B54D6-A5A0-4FFF-BCFE-DFCC33F70302.jpeg
 

Chris

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Hi Nige

Fantastic photos. Love the fact they look period now.

Chris
 
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Great pictures! If you have more, show us please. When the 840ccm engine was warm, it ran brilliantly. Until there were violent misfires and some other problems appeared. I decided to have a new engine built by a German Triumph Racing specialist, Jörg Winkelmann. In the case of a race use the engine should then be further developed (length of the inlet tubes and air intakes etc. etc.) From the 840ccm engine we have essentially used the transmission, the cams and clutch and went back to 750ccm by using an Triumph crankshaft. We have reached 65 hp. The compression ratio is high, but there are no negative effects on road use purposes. Unfortunately I had to dampen the exhausts, which did not affect the performance on the road so much. All original parts are still in my hands and after ten years I'm thinking about rebuilding the 840ccm engine.


 

Fast Eddie

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Yes, I can see now that the head is different etc. The squished head on the 840 motor is probably where a lot of power is though you know.

I know different dynos give different figures etc. But on the same dyno that my current fairly highly modified Commando gives 64rwhp the 840 Triton gave 75. That’s quite a difference. Especially on such a light bike.

I don’t think the extra capacity gives any more power, but the extra low end torque provided by the bigger, longer stroke motor allows for a state of tune that gives more high rpm power whilst still having great low end drive out of corners.

Although the motor would rev freely to 8,000rpm, peak power was at around 7,000 as I recall.

As you know, it had Spitfire profile cams in with offset buttons in the inlet rockers (increasing the lift by about .080” if I recall correctly) so the cam set up is quite extreme really.

When we first built it, it had 4220 cams, essentially the same as Hyde half race cams, and with the offset rockers, it made for a tremendously torquey motor that still revved out nicely. Power in this set up was mid 60s. For road use, I’d say this would be an ideal road set up.

So, all in all, I’d urge you to get the 840 motor sorted again!
 

Fast Eddie

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I notice in the pictures that you have the rocker boxes fitted with the oil feed on the left hand side.

As standard, Triumphs always had the feed on the right hand side.

Under normal circumstances, it does no matter at all. But, it made me wonder, have you inadvertently fitted the inlet rocker's, complete with the offset buttons (giving greater lift) in the exhaust side?!?
 
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Pre-unit Tritons have a bit of history which almost makes them authentic as an historic bike. But in actual fact a pre-unit Triton can never handle as good as a genuine Manx. And a Triton with a unit motor is hopeless at speed in any bend. The weight distribution is ridiculous and the gap behind the gearbox is horrible. The theory was 'a good motor in the best frame' - good in theory, but not in practice. In a road race, a genuine 500cc Manx with usually trounce any 650cc Triton. I have raced a Triton against 1963 Bonnevilles - they were a much better bike than a Triton. One of those, done properly is a real gem.
 
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Hahahaha
I'll take an original or at least a faithful reproduction over a replica with bad details, any day.
The small Italian bikes had 36 spokes, so I'm not sure how they got that detail wrong on this Robinson.
Because Robinson like Dunstall had the parts made in Italy??
 
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