Type F being phased out?

gortnipper

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Is Type F tranny fluid being phased out? I see that neither the Repco nor Supercheap stores have it in stock near me in NZ, though you can get Penrite (only) in 4L size at other stores. There used to be many brands/bottle sizes.
 
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Is Type F tranny fluid being phased out? I see that neither the Repco nor Supercheap stores have it in stock near me in NZ, though you can get Penrite (only) in 4L size at other stores. There used to be many brands/bottle sizes.
Are you rererring to Ford Spec M2C33F ATF or something else? Castrol still sell 1 litre bottles but the spec is now M2C33G.

HTH
Ctefeh
 
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Yes, the M2C33F. So, M2C33G fluids are all backwards compatible?
Gortnipper,
Yeah it is. I went through the same frustration. Ford AUS (I am in AUS) themselves stopped using it a while after the C4/C6/FMX boxes were superseded way back in the day. I read a tech article that said that the old "F" had been replaced by "G" (for some time now), hence why my searches almost always came up empty.
Backwards compatible.

Valvoline also market Type F fluid.

HTH
Ctefeh
 

concours

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As for our primary drives, the whole notion that it’s necessary to use Type F for the clutch to work, is ridiculous.
I’ve had Dexron in mine from the first rebuild, 34,000 miles clutch works perfect.
Because, (o_O) every other automatic transmission on the planet has clutches, gears, bearings too.
:p:cool:
 
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Because, (o_O) every other automatic transmission on the planet has clutches, gears, bearings too.
:p:cool:

That is true, but it is also true that, over the years, the adhesive used to fix the friction material on to brake bands has changed and some grades of atf dissolved some types of adhesive.
Also, the friction material itself differed in composition/friction qualities and required different formulations of atf.
 

concours

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That is true, but it is also true that, over the years, the adhesive used to fix the friction material on to brake bands has changed and some grades of atf dissolved some types of adhesive.
Also, the friction material itself differed in composition/friction qualities and required different formulations of atf.
Excellent!:cool:
Please, tell us how it would be relevant to Norton clutches...
 
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Excellent!:cool:
Please, tell us how it would be relevant to Norton clutches...

You said ' As for our primary drives, the whole notion that it’s necessary to use Type F for the clutch to work, is rediculous. '

My reply was an attempt to suggest a reason why some people feel that only a very particular type of atf is suitable for Commando primary drives. Clearly, my comments were unhelpful and unwelcome so you have my apologies.
 

concours

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You said ' As for our primary drives, the whole notion that it’s necessary to use Type F for the clutch to work, is rediculous. '

My reply was an attempt to suggest a reason why some people feel that only a very particular type of atf is suitable for Commando primary drives. Clearly, my comments were unhelpful and unwelcome so you have my apologies.
No apology needed.
I used your post as a springboard, to further the discussion about the O.P.’s quest for Type F.
Riders can save the effort searching.
The ATF already on everyone’s shelf will work well in a Norton clutch.
 

gtiller

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I was told that Dex ATF is not as friendly on bronze bushings (and hence sintered bronze clutch plates) versus Type F ATF which was originally developed exactly for that purpose?

GM and Ford have now entered some kind of alliance and are jointly developing an ATF that is suitable for all types plus they have a greed to use a common set of material across their transmission assemblies.
They are developing with 'sealed for life' in mind.
...my only concern with this is they'll be using friction modifiers that may make a 'dry' clutch stack slip.
 
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I've been using Dexron in my Commando since 2006. Same clutch discs/steels are still there - no slip, easy two finger pull... ;)
 

SteveA

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You said ' As for our primary drives, the whole notion that it’s necessary to use Type F for the clutch to work, is rediculous. '

........Clearly, my comments were unhelpful and unwelcome so you have my apologies.

Perhaps in the interests of transatlantic friendship and understanding we should provide the full English translation for this sentence?

Oh do go away, and while you are at it, learn to spell ridiculous! ;)

The Anglo Saxon is much shorter! :oops:
 

Bill C.

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The instructor of the transmission class at a trade school I went to in the 70s said type F had a " higher coefficient of friction ". Per his recommendation I used it in a Chrysler Torqueflite that was slipping excessively going into third gear. It solved the problem. Made all the shifts more harsh. Put quite a few miles on it without any more problems.
 

concours

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I was told that Dex ATF is not as friendly on bronze bushings (and hence sintered bronze clutch plates) versus Type F ATF which was originally developed exactly for that purpose?

GM and Ford have now entered some kind of alliance and are jointly developing an ATF that is suitable for all types plus they have a greed to use a common set of material across their transmission assemblies.
They are developing with 'sealed for life' in mind.
...my only concern with this is they'll be using friction modifiers that may make a 'dry' clutch stack slip.
We have multiple master amongst us, who knows a LOT about Nortons, a LOT about transmissions (and lots of other stuff) who can pontificate about ATF friction modifiers. He may choose to chime in.
 

concours

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The instructor of the transmission class at a trade school I went to in the 70s said type F had a " higher coefficient of friction ". Per his recommendation I used it in a Chrysler Torqueflite that was slipping excessively going into third gear. It solved the problem. Made all the shifts more harsh. Put quite a few miles on it without any more problems.
...and I ran Dexron in my ‘68 Ford with a C4 because it leaked like a sieve, and Dex was free. No problems.
 

RoadScholar

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Barnett recommends either Dexron or type "F" for clutch packs they sell that run in lubrication separate from engine/transmission; they note that the type "F" will produce a more noticeable engagement point then the Dextron, but don't suggest one over the other. I tried both in a BSA 441, when I could start it, and liked the Dexron.

Best.
 
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The instructor of the transmission class at a trade school I went to in the 70s said type F had a " higher coefficient of friction ". Per his recommendation I used it in a Chrysler Torqueflite that was slipping excessively going into third gear. It solved the problem. Made all the shifts more harsh. Put quite a few miles on it without any more problems.
Bill, you beat me to it. I was told the same thing while attending a class on automatic transmission overhaul. That was back when The Flintstones was a reality show! :D They told us that the Ford engineers aim was to extend clutch and band life, thereby extending the life of the transmission. GM & Chrysler engineers used Dexron to get smoother shifting [slight clutch slippage during the shift]. My guess is that the marketing department had more say about engineering decisions at GM and Chrysler. That said, in the 60s and 70s, the transmissions of "the big 3" lasted about the same.

Charlie K
 
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snipped I tried both in a BSA 441, when I could start it, and liked the Dexron.
Back in the day, when my Harley buddies would pontificate on how you had to be a real man to kick start a Harley, I'd tell them to try starting my 1972 BSA Gold Star 500 single. After they made fools of themselves, I'd start it on 2 kicks! I did a frame up restoration on that bike. It was a basket-case when I got it. I wish I still had it.
Charlie K
 
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