Stainless shortcomings

marshg246

VIP MEMBER
Joined
Jul 12, 2015
Messages
1,302
Country flag
I thought it seemed a bit high as well, pulled out my trusty circa 1972 factory service manual - sure enough - 180 in.lb is specified.

I have made my own SS rocker banjo bolts from 303 SS hex bar - never had one break.
Agreed it's in the Workshop manuals - for the factory bolt. This thread is not about a factory bolt. I should have been more clear - I assumed he got the torque value from the vendor and I wanted to know about that - bad assumption.
 
Last edited:

jimbo

VIP MEMBER
Joined
Sep 25, 2004
Messages
1,752
Country flag
Buchannan ss spokes broke in my MKIII rear wheel years ago, when I complained and voiced my concern , they didn't really care too much.( common problem?) There are all kinds of stainless steel, cheap low strength 316 and more strong alloys . If pretty is what you want go with ss .
 
Joined
Jan 17, 2020
Messages
31
Country flag
I recently had a Stainless center stand spring fail . Fractured just behind the coils where the tang for the stand begins . Stand dropped while riding . The spring was less than a year old and under 1k miles and was purchased from a very reputable supplier.
It happened twice to me. The last time attending Wyoming Norton rally in 2013. No more stainless spring. The stand's weight cut the hook very early.
 
Joined
Jan 17, 2020
Messages
31
Country flag
This failure of a Stainless banjo bolt for the rocker oil lines (double line), occurred at about 1/2 the recommended 180"/lbs. It had been in use, removed without undue force and upon refitting snapped with little effort. The fitting also had never been struck/abused. A reminder that some "upgrades" especially those in Stainless may not be up to original engineering standards.
Any other S/S disappointments to share?
WOJ6gx8.jpg


Cheers
The double banjo line design should raise a concern. Longer banjo bolt, 3 washers to compress instead of 2, heavier weight submitted to vibration, is it not too much for an already fragile hollow bolt???
 
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
5,712
Country flag
Why on earth would one ever need to take a modern Triumph apart? I mean in a normal human lifespan. It's possible that at some time way in the future, when fossil fuels are only available for purchase in small boutique specialty shops, a 150 year old Hinckley designed Triumph might need repair.
Jk, but they are ridiculously reliable.
I did take some bolts out to replace the worn out sprockets and chain (24,000 kms). Bike is 5 years old. All fastenings were as new, no corrosion.

Back to stainless.
When a stainless part fails, we blame stainless. When a steel part fails we order a new one. Sometimes a redesign and strength upgrade is included.
My steel sidestand spring broke last year. I ordered a new one.


Glen
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 21, 2019
Messages
859
Country flag
can't say i've ever had a piece of stainless hardware fail (knock on wood), but i guess there's always a first. i never use stainless where grade 8 is spec'd.
 

MikeG

VIP MEMBER
Joined
May 31, 2012
Messages
594
Country flag
Why on earth would one ever need to take a modern Triumph apart? I mean in a normal human lifespan.

To straighten out all the stuff that the dealer SHOULD have taken care of when it was taken out of the crate and assembled. It has stranded me on 3 occasions, and that's 3 more than my Norton has so far.


Glen
 
Joined
Oct 28, 2009
Messages
793
Country flag
I agree with Sergio's comment above, that a single bolt that takes two banjos looks like a flawed design. I am not sure if a double banjo (with two spigots) is still available.
 

Dommie Nator

VIP MEMBER
Joined
Apr 2, 2013
Messages
706
Country flag
Why on earth would one ever need to take a modern Triumph apart? I mean in a normal human lifespan. It's possible that at some time way in the future, when fossil fuels are only available for purchase in small boutique specialty shops, a 150 year old Hinckley designed Triumph might need repair.
Jk, but they are ridiculously reliable.

Tell that to the owners who have had sprag clutches break, aluminium frames crack at the headstock, 4th gears explode, plastic fuel connectors crumble, ECU s fail, petrol tanks split, spokes snap...
 
Joined
Jan 30, 2020
Messages
338
Country flag
And I decided an itch I had to scratch was a Triumph Explorer. What a mistake. It broke down in Italy requiring a main dealer to collect me, remove the fuel tank - special tool needed, no way to roadside repair, then fit a new fuse to the fan, refill with coolant special tool again. What ‘adventure’ bike can’t be roadside repaired. When I got home I bought yet another ZZR1400. Never , ever, another Triumph for me unless it’s a Meriden brew.
 
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
5,712
Country flag
Tell that to the owners who have had sprag clutches break, aluminium frames crack at the headstock, 4th gears explode, plastic fuel connectors crumble, ECU s fail, petrol tanks split, spokes snap...
I run two modern Triumphs and there are eight of various type and age owned by friends. We don't carry tools and none of us have had any serious issue with many 100s of thousands kms covered. A couple have gone round the clock and are still running great. Those are the bikes I see in regular use and they have been utterly reliable. There will always be some exceptions to the rule, however.

Glen
 

Mart UK

VIP MEMBER
Joined
Mar 11, 2021
Messages
129
Country flag
I run two modern Triumphs and there are eight of various type and age owned by friends. We don't carry tools and none of us have had any serious issue with many 100s of thousands kms covered. A couple have gone round the clock and are still running great. Those are the bikes I see in regular use and they have been utterly reliable. There will always be some exceptions to the rule, however.

Glen
Off topic, sorry: A mate has a 2017 T120, with 30,000 miles. Never a problem until last month his reg/rec died. The factory authorised a replacement, no charge for parts or labour. I'm impressed with that.
 

MikeG

VIP MEMBER
Joined
May 31, 2012
Messages
594
Country flag
Off topic, sorry: A mate has a 2017 T120, with 30,000 miles. Never a problem until last month his reg/rec died. The factory authorised a replacement, no charge for parts or labour. I'm impressed with that.

My rectifier on my 17 T100 was never properly plugged in from new. Charging system failed 400 miles from home causing the battery to die. Diagnosed the problem and got home but the extreme cycling of the battery caused it to go bad within a month. Bike would start fine one time and completely loose all power the next. Took it back to the dealer and they spent three hours trying to find a wiring problem rather than just load test the battery and find the REAL trouble. They then tried to bill me for three hours labor because the had nothing to bill Triumph back for on a warranty claim. The bike had just over 1000 miles on it and was supposedly covered by a 3 year warranty. I refused to pay the three hours they wanted ended up contacting Triumph headquarters in Georgia and they authorized battery replacement. A year later same issue, dead battery no start. This bike sits in a heated garage on a tender all winter. My 07 Suzuki gets the same treatment and it's battery went 9 yearsm, and I only replaced it because it was old. I'm pretty unimpressed with Hinkley and my local dealers service.
 

Dommie Nator

VIP MEMBER
Joined
Apr 2, 2013
Messages
706
Country flag
I run two modern Triumphs and there are eight of various type and age owned by friends. We don't carry tools and none of us have had any serious issue with many 100s of thousands kms covered. A couple have gone round the clock and are still running great. Those are the bikes I see in regular use and they have been utterly reliable. There will always be some exceptions to the rule, however.

Glen
I've had five Hinckley Triumphs and spent a good few years on the T595.net forum. There was quite a few "exceptions".
 

madass140

VIP MEMBER
Joined
Nov 6, 2011
Messages
2,096
Country flag
I tested one of my Titanium 5/16" x 22 tpi banjo bolts that I supply with my oil pressure switch
that replaces the rocker oil feed banjo bolt on the timing cover. It broke at 29ft/lbs
 
Joined
Aug 25, 2010
Messages
1
Country flag
Buchannan ss spokes broke in my MKIII rear wheel years ago, when I complained and voiced my concern , they didn't really care too much.( common problem?) There are all kinds of stainless steel, cheap low strength 316 and more strong alloys . If pretty is what you want go with ss .
Finally talking about grades of stainless steel. I only have marine background experience but can say that 316 is very strong but brittle at the same time but will not rust, 304 grade will stain from rust but is more malleable so can be used to manufacture items that need to be bent into shape. So as an example you would not generally use 316 gr for screws as they will snap under the torque from the screwdriver. It is necessary to trade of what you want out of the manufactured item when choosing the grade of stainless. Like I say I am no expert but have user experience.
Rod.
 
Joined
Apr 20, 2011
Messages
5,809
Country flag
My rectifier on my 17 T100 was never properly plugged in from new. Charging system failed 400 miles from home causing the battery to die. Diagnosed the problem and got home but the extreme cycling of the battery caused it to go bad within a month. Bike would start fine one time and completely loose all power the next. Took it back to the dealer and they spent three hours trying to find a wiring problem rather than just load test the battery and find the REAL trouble. They then tried to bill me for three hours labor because the had nothing to bill Triumph back for on a warranty claim. The bike had just over 1000 miles on it and was supposedly covered by a 3 year warranty. I refused to pay the three hours they wanted ended up contacting Triumph headquarters in Georgia and they authorized battery replacement. A year later same issue, dead battery no start. This bike sits in a heated garage on a tender all winter. My 07 Suzuki gets the same treatment and it's battery went 9 yearsm, and I only replaced it because it was old. I'm pretty unimpressed with Hinkley and my local dealers service.
They don't train the "olde world mechanics " like they used to.
If they can't plug in a computer to diagnose with a " fault finder app" then some are clueless.
 

Fast Eddie

VIP MEMBER
Joined
Oct 4, 2013
Messages
14,976
Country flag
They don't train the "olde world mechanics " like they used to.
If they can't plug in a computer to diagnose with a " fault finder app" then some are clueless.
Tell me about it! Got exactly that issue with the Missus car at present.
 

Mart UK

VIP MEMBER
Joined
Mar 11, 2021
Messages
129
Country flag
I was shopping for a new car (used) for my daughter yesterday. The brake fluid on one was very dark. I asked the salesman when it was last changed. He was adamant you no longer need to EVER change brake fluid on the new breed of cars. He opened the cap, dipped his finger in and wiped it on the car's white paintwork, to show me how clean the fluid was. He confirmed it was DOT4... We walked away.
 
Top