Most common engines

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What is the most common motor used in wideline tritons..

5T 6T T110 T120 is one more desirable than the other, price, power, reliability.


Thanks
Mark
 

Fast Eddie

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Bit of a broad question really.

But I’d say it largely depends on what you want to use it for, why you want to build one, what you already have at hand, and how much money you want to sink into it...
 
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it was just a broad question as i have seen so many varied bikes and wondered if there was a prefered engine for road use..
 

Fast Eddie

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No, there is no one best choice. Even within an engine choice, there’s personal preference over spec.
Some people want big cams, pistons and carbs for max fun 5,000 to 7,000.
Some people want max torque from tick over and zero desire to rev above 4,000.
Some swear by twin carbs.
Some swear by single carbs.
Some prefer the sweetness of a 500. Most probably prefer 650. Some prefer 750. Some odd balls bore and stroke to 850 or more. Some complete weirdos opt for 900cc+ 8 valve top ends.
But I’d venture to guess that most people would consider a 650 Bonnie engine as the archetypal Triton Power.
Then you gotta choose unit or pre unit.
And then the gearbox.
Etc.
That’s assuming your talking twins, and not triples...
 

t ingermanson

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Fast Eddie is right. No one best motor for all people or uses. Think about what you want, be patient, purchase what you can get a deal on. Building a Triton in a hurry is a good way to bankrupt yourself and end up with something that you'll not be able to sell for half of what you paid.

If at all possible, buy in the largest chunks you can find. There will still be plenty of head scratching and fabrication on a complete bike to make it like you want it to be and undoing the PO's ideas.

Tritons are also not as "plug and play" as some would have you believe. They require some fabrication knowledge and tools, piles of money, or both.

  • Pre units look best, full stop.
  • AMC/Norton boxes are smoother shifting.
  • Belt drives can be a joy or a nightmare.
  • Brit bikes require a whole lot of new tools. Make sure you're into it. Even the just thread counts and pitches and their required taps, dies, and helicoil kits can be mind numbing and wallet draining.
  • NOTHING (I really mean it) "just bolts up". Making adapters will be your new job.
  • Nortons are better supported parts-wise than Triumph. There are more Triumphs, but buying parts for their motors can be an exercise in frustration. RGM and Andover are extremely helpful in keeping these Norton bikes going.
Entering the world of Brit bikes with a Triton build is jumping into the deep end. You might consider buying a complete Norton first since it will all be covered in one parts book. Once the bike is running and operable, you'll be able to make changes easier than from the ground up with piles of parts books. There are plenty of mongrels around to start with. Who knows? You might find the increased horsepower from the Norton 650ss or Atlas preferable to the same displacement Triumph motors.
 
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If you’re building a special, you shouldn’t have to ask others what your preferences are.

A Speed Twin might be a bit slow.
A rigid frame Triumph primary case fills the frame better than a short one.
Alternators are more practical than dynamos.
Fitting a Triumph gearbox is probably easier than a Norton or BSA gearbox.
 
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I certainly won't be building from scratch that's for sure but plan to or would want to "restore" if that's the right phrase and completed rough bike... Fabrication is ok for me as i used to restore Classic cars for a living many years ago but have got rid of most if not all my old AF/BSF tools.. :mad: I fabricated all the frame strengthening brackets and adapted it to fit my RGV250 rear swing arm into the RD350lc Frame.

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IMG_1745 by mark morgan, on Flickr

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IMG_1742 by mark morgan, on Flickr

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IMG_1711 by mark morgan, on Flickr

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IMG_2866 by mark morgan, on Flickr

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IMG_2864 by mark morgan, on Flickr

Ideally run and tinker for a season before the stripdown rebuild to see what power etc i want need..

I have been looking and like the Pre units best and would probably go 650 but if the right bike with a 500 or 750 came up, Twin carbs only only for aesthetic reasons.
 
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The old girl is coming on slowly..

Just tank and panel paint and engine rebuild to do.
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IMG_4287 by mark morgan, on Flickr

The misses is having a fit with me building her up in the dinning room but i need a dust and damp free environment ;)
 
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If I were to build a Triton it would be a pre unit, as the featherbed frame is too long for a unit motor. I would start off with a set of cases from Thunder Engineering which I imagine are based on the old Puma cases, & a T140 crank, rods, & top end. A Nourish top end would be nice but sadly no longer available.
On the other hand why build a Triton when Norton motors are so much better ?

Martyn.
 
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My Featherbed has neater welds than that.

If you’re buying someone else’s troubles, I mean project, you could try to see what the original builder was visualising and make that real.

It’s worth studying photos of cafe racers in the 1960s and noting the differences between those bikes and the “perfect examples” that rich fat old men are entering into shows nowadays.
 
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Pre units look better in the Featherbed frames, but why not build it with a Commando motor and keep it all Norton and with the motor tilting forward as the Commando's they look faster tilted lol, I built mine over 38 years ago converting as much of my Commando gear as I could use, with the HOT 850 and balanced crank its a pleasure to ride, super lite and handles like its on rails and very reliable.
The Commando motor just looks right in the Wideline frame, I have 2 modern Thruxtons and I still love riding my HOT Featherbed, its showing its age now but still gets many onlookers where ever I go or park up.

Ashley
 
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Pre units look better in the Featherbed frames, but why not build it with a Commando motor and keep it all Norton and with the motor tilting forward as the Commando's they look faster tilted lol, I built mine over 38 years ago converting as much of my Commando gear as I could use, with the HOT 850 and balanced crank its a pleasure to ride, super lite and handles like its on rails and very reliable.
The Commando motor just looks right in the Wideline frame, I have 2 modern Thruxtons and I still love riding my HOT Featherbed, its showing its age now but still gets many onlookers where ever I go or park up.

Ashley
Ash if I did it wouldn't be a triton... I won't be scratch building but looking to buy a complete Tatty bike. Maybe if the motor that comes with the bike isn't fast or good enough i may change it..
 
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My friend Don who got me into Norton's and Featherbeds when I was 17 back in 1976 Don at the time had a hot 750 Commando in a Wideline and I had a Honda TL250 trials bike at the time that Don like to play on we swapped bikes for the day and I was so impressed with the Norton and Featherbed I brought a new 850 Commando 2 weeks later then in 79 Don sold me one of his Featherbed frames and in 1980 I started the conversion, Don at the time started to build Tritons and got away from Norton's.
We are still good mates and he still has a few Tritons in his collections, but he keeps blowing them up lol, I built mine differently from his orginal Commando/Featherbed and he keeps shaking his head that mine is so reliable compared to his Tritons, his racing Triton had 14/1 cpmpression and was one of the reasons he kept blowing it up, the cases couldn't handle it, he now makes his own cases and runs one piece Norton crank in his Triton.
He also has built a twin engine Triton but its never got ridden he built it for shows and to sell his heavy duty Triumph crank cases that he gets made, but at $5,500 for a set of cases he didn't sell to many.
He use to tow his racing Triton on a special trailer behind his old Shovel Head Harley, it was a sight to see and always drew a crowd when he pulled up at Lakeside Raceway in the days.

Ashley
 
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I did't know i was entering a welding competition:p just trying to remove the horrible Jap welds from 37 years ago...
I will have to brush up on my Tig skills o_O

Alas, Tig welding were not around when, I think, the last F/Bed was made-
 
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