Giving up.

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Sad to hear Ken,
But these bikes are only on loan to us, and as we get older we can be happy that we kept them from being destroyed and are able to pass them on to the next caretaker.
I just sold my Mk3 as I can't use it as it should be used, and it's wrong for it to sit in the shed.
It's like selling a child,,,,,,,, but things change.
Good luck to you in the future. Glad you made the decision before it's made for you.

Regards
Graeme
 
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which sort of ties in with the thread drift towards horses, and the old joke about what do you put on your rhubarb?
How many of you know that in the Rhubarb triangle in Lincolnshire/ Yorkshire they grow rhubarb in shoddy . . . . ( I'm not making this up)
 
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What in the world is 'shoddy'? Remember some of us speak another 'English'. Thanks for your patience. I have my suspicions already.
 
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"...horse riding more dangerous than riding a motorcycle" and horse riding is 20 times more dangerous !!!!!

My wife does both - was a competition jumper, now just rides for fun. When she was jumping, I said on several different occasions, "This is the last time I'm going to the hospital with you!" But, of course, I kept going... broken leg, broken collarbone, broken arm, broken shoulder - rebuilt with pins/metal (sets off the airport detectors), dislocated knee, uncountable sprains, etc. She has much bigger cajones than me - I would have quit the first time the horse refused a jump and pitched me off!

But I have been seriously thinking lately that maybe I (we!) have done enough motorcycle riding... We'll see.
 

Onder

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After the last few days of standing down and falling down and sad tales I rode out yesterday wondering if I should. Had a great long
ride, little traffic, fine weather and returned on the same bum boat I left on.
Ride on!
 

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Onder

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...and by the way, lifted from wiki:
shoddyRecycled or remanufactured wool. Historically generated from loosely woven materials. Benjamin Law invented shoddy and mungo, as such, in England in 1813. He was the first to organise, on a larger scale, the activity of taking old clothes and grinding them down into a fibrous state that could be re-spun into yarn. The shoddy industry was centred on the towns of Batley, Morley, Dewsbury and Ossett in West Yorkshire, and concentrated on the recovery of wool from rags. The importance of the industry can be gauged by the fact that even in 1860 the town of Batley was producing over 7,000 tonnes of shoddy. At the time there were 80 firms employing a total of 550 people sorting the rags. These were then sold to shoddy manufacturers of which there were about 130 in the West Riding. Shoddy is inferior to the original wool. "Shoddy" has come to mean "of poor quality" in general (not just clothing), and the original meaning is largely obsolete.
 
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Motorcycles sense fear as well and act accordingly.
Yeah that's one way of looking at it.

In my experience road motorcycles react to rider error and then there is a brief second of fear before survival instinct kicks in, and ya start checking to see if any body parts are missing before picking up the bike. That assumes one is still conscious though.
 
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...and by the way, lifted from wiki:
shoddyRecycled or remanufactured wool. Historically generated from loosely woven materials. Benjamin Law invented shoddy and mungo, as such, in England in 1813. He was the first to organise, on a larger scale, the activity of taking old clothes and grinding them down into a fibrous state that could be re-spun into yarn. The shoddy industry was centred on the towns of Batley, Morley, Dewsbury and Ossett in West Yorkshire, and concentrated on the recovery of wool from rags. The importance of the industry can be gauged by the fact that even in 1860 the town of Batley was producing over 7,000 tonnes of shoddy. At the time there were 80 firms employing a total of 550 people sorting the rags. These were then sold to shoddy manufacturers of which there were about 130 in the West Riding. Shoddy is inferior to the original wool. "Shoddy" has come to mean "of poor quality" in general (not just clothing), and the original meaning is largely obsolete.
Like true Yorkshire men, they didn't waste anything in that part of the world.
I should also mention that they only got rhubarb planted in shoddy that had been outside for 2 years, and the plant is grown in a dark place by 24 hour candlelight.
 
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What in the world is 'shoddy'? Remember some of us speak another 'English'. Thanks for your patience. I have my suspicions already.
'Shoddy' is like 'brummy'. 'Brummy' means made in Birmingham.
 
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Yeah that's one way of looking at it.

In my experience road motorcycles react to rider error and then there is a brief second of fear before survival instinct kicks in, and ya start checking to see if any body parts are missing before picking up the bike. That assumes one is still conscious though.
I take a beta blocker for a heart condition. If you ride fast and have a moment, it is easy to over-react slightly and have a real problem. The beta-blocker stops that and you just handle the issue in the cold hard light of day. It does not change your reaction time, you just do not get that grip around the heart which makes you jump. When you race, adrenalin is your enemy. You are usually wound up already without it. All adrenalin does when you race, is adversely affect your judgement.
 
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'Shoddy' is like 'brummy'. 'Brummy' means made in Birmingham.
Eee-by -gum laddie, you're beginning to understand the language. . . . .but have you ever listened to someone talking in thick Brummie? I personally can't make out a head or tail of what they're saying. . . . And I don't mean any disrespect.
 

BERT

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For every person that stops riding, hopefully another person will start and these great machines will keep running the road
 

Time Warp

.......back to the 70's.
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Unless there was something leading up to this as in a progressive problem it seems like a over reaction. (unless there is more to it)
If it was a sudden balance problem (if the case) its not rocket science as far as what to do and who to see.

The more to it was not a bad hunch.

Anyone who has diabetes has to change their lifestyle, there is no choice.
I would consider servicing and cleaning the bike then put it under a suitable cover and do whatever was needed in the next six months to be in a condition to not only ride it again but have a better life in general.

Or you can just give up, next it will be no driving followed by loss of mobility and maybe a few toes cut off in the future with enough time left to ponder the past.

This thread reads like an obituary in part. (I attended a funeral yesterday)

Go see a doctor, see two, change or live to regret it.

I am 62 this year.
 

DogT

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I saw doctors for a couple years. Did nothing for me other than sit in offices and spend insurance money. I feel better without them, not that I don't check in with the GP and cardio. But they didn't do anything for the aggravating things that bother me. I do keep my BP at 120/70 and keep my weight down under 180lb. Currently I'm fighting my leg/foot pain. Doesn't stop me, but it's surely aggravating and I can't stand very long. I can however walk a lot. But yes, don't just give up and become a couch potato. I'm 77 and once in a while think about riding the '69, but it's been a few years, I did start it the other week. It happens to all of us.
Just don't stop, keep doing what you can even if slower. I have to say riding scares the dickens out of me.
 

Fullauto

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The more to it was not a bad hunch.

Anyone who has diabetes has to change their lifestyle, there is no choice.
I would consider servicing and cleaning the bike then put it under a suitable cover and do whatever was needed in the next six months to be in a condition to not only ride it again but have a better life in general.

Or you can just give up, next it will be no driving followed by loss of mobility and maybe a few toes cut off in the future with enough time left to ponder the past.

This thread reads like an obituary in part. (I attended a funeral yesterday)

Go see a doctor, see two, change or live to regret it.

I am 62 this year.
Hahahaha, Get a little time up before giving advice. Or, if you prefer, walk a mile in my shoes.
 
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Just don't stop, keep doing what you can even if slower. I have to say riding scares the dickens out of me.

A sidecar will remove the fear and anticipation of falling over, the low speed wobbles etc.. just remember to watchout for bends.. But that apart you retain most of the positives about riding a bike which make it preferable tothe alternatives
 
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A sidecar will remove the fear and anticipation of falling over, the low speed wobbles etc.. just remember to watchout for bends.. But that apart you retain most of the positives about riding a bike which make it preferable tothe alternatives
A sidecar attached to a solo motorcycle will give you a whole lot of wobbles and tank slappers unless you fit sidecar fork yolks or carry out suitable modifications to the steering head/forks, so, ....not much difference really............either way, you'll be back to square one.
 
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