Giving up.

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Feb 7, 2010
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I don't look forward to the day when I realize I can't trust myself to ride . I've had 3 crashes in the last 20 years. The first one scared the crap out of me and it was 6 months before I could comfortably ride and another year that blind hills didn't accelerate my heartbeat. After the last get-off 3 years ago in
July it was just a matter of healing and rehabbing and I went out and replaced the crashed bike.
When I mount up, my balance and control inputs are fine and only my deteriorating vision is an issue.
Sooner or later, we all have to make the call if we survive,
 

Carl H

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Dec 13, 2017
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It is wth some regret that I am ceasnig my association with my Commando. I went for a ride a couple of days ago to catch up with a friend for coffee. I wobbled my way there and wobbled my way back. Entering my carport, I fell off at low speed and couldn't get up. It required my son and a neighbour to get me up and around and get me seated and into a chair. My balance mechanism appears to be not at it's best. So, I've decided that the time has come. Minor damage to the bike, basically a bent footpeg which will be replaced. I do not have the capacity to either maintain or wash/polish it anymore either. my riding days are done. I recently found out that my grandfather on my mother's side died when he was hit by a car while on his bike at 65 years of age. I turned 65 a while back and have no desire to tempt fate. I intend to get a few jobs on the bike done and polished to within an inch of it's life and then put it in the classifieds. Such is life. I'll still be hanging around keeping an eye on things Norton so I'll see you guys around Good Luck !
Some times just working on them and remembering the good times, help things roll along. Best wishes and the main thing is to stay save.
 
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I've had a bike with a great big double adult side car , never again. . . .
i started off on outfits... my last was bsa super rocket with watsonian palma .. fast and fun .. the main issue wasthat back in theday our 4wheeled friends did not expect sidecar to be moving towards them at speed in excess of 30 or 40mph... and would pullout accordingly
 
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Well anyway.... May God bless Fullauto and keep him well. The man's life and decision are his own and should receive due respect for he knows what's best for him..... I hope his knowledge remains forthcoming, and advice.... Let's not forget that.
 
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Jun 30, 2012
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When I first started riding motorcycles on public roads, my mother insisted I do it with a sidecar attached to my Indian. I bought one from a friend which I later found out had half the bearings missing from it's wheel. It stuck me into a paling fence and I ended up spitting out splinters of wood. After I fixed it, it was OK. But the friend I had bought the sidecar off really loved them and had crashed them many times.
Life was not meant to be easy and when you have had a blow to your confidence, it cam become more difficult. THe last time I took my bike to Winton Raceway, everything which could go wrong, did go wrong. I had to be rescued three times. The bike fell over on the trailer as I was putting it on. A tyre gave up on the trailer halfway to the circuit and I could not get the wheel nuts undone to dput the spare on. When I got to the circuit, the bike refused to start, and I had to borrow spark plugs. Then I found the change direction in the gear box was upside down and I almost crashed the bike into a fence. All in all, it was a really bum day. When that sort of thing happens, your thinking changes. What was easy becomes difficult, because your confidence has taken a hit. You then need to take a step back and think rationally.
 
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I am nearly 80 years of age and I am convinced I can still road race. When I was a kid, I was inexperienced and some awful things happened to me in road races. But that is not my current situation. If you think about how good it was when it was good, , it will be that good again. 'Slow and steady wins the race'. Never do anything quickly and always think first before acting. My Seeley 850 is surprisingly fast for what it is - when I ride it my actions are always slow and measured. I just sit there like a blob and do it.
Riding a motorcycle on public roads is always dangerous. That is the reason I do not do it. On a race circuit there are no cars or trucks to run you over. And no police. Your fate is in your own hands, and I trust mine.
 
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