1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

V-Twins in Featherbeds

Discussion in 'General Classic Motorcycle Discussion' started by Bernhard, Mar 25, 2014.

  1. Petersen

    Petersen

    Joined:
    May 2, 2014
    I think to slot a Hedlund v-twin engine in there is a good use of an old Featherbed. I like this one which was featured in the Swedish magazine "MCM" in the late '90s.

    [​IMG]

    The frame is a 1953 wideline which was taken out 20mm to accomodate the Hedlund. Forks and shocks are Marzocchi, rims are Akront, frontbrake is a Grimeca, rear is a Commando. Gearbox from Quaife.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The production of the 1000cc Hedlund started in 1978, built by Swede Nisse Hedlund primarily for sidecar racing. 50 engines were built.
     
  2. Bernhard

    Bernhard

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011

    Save yourself the agro of using an original frame, one of the frame makers advertise making frames for the H/D engine.
     
  3. acotrel

    acotrel

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    The front cylinder head and exhaust pipe on the bike in the photo, stop the motor from being two inches further forward because of the frame tubes. A Mk3 Seeley frame might be better handling than a featherbed, with that motor. Whichever frame is used, two front heads would be good. A single carb on a Harley motor in either frame would be like a racing car with a log manifold.
     
  4. Petersen

    Petersen

    Joined:
    May 2, 2014
    I spotted this Danish Ducton (or Norcati) at the Rockers vs Mods in Malmö, Sweden in 2016. Ducati Monster engine, I believe.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Fast Eddie

    Fast Eddie VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2013
    So...

    Has he improved an old Norton...

    Or ruined a perfectly good Ducati...?!?
     
  6. acotrel

    acotrel

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    It depends on where the weight distribution ends up. A featherbed frame bike which is light in the front, can destroy the riders' confidence. The bike can feel very vague in the middle of corners. With a Manx motor, the weight is well forward an down low in the featherbed frame - so the handling is always positive and the bike tightens it's line slightly when coming out of corners.
     
  7. Fast Eddie

    Fast Eddie VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2013
    Indeed Al, and with that horizontal front cylinder, it’s difficult to see how he cudda got the mass of the engine far enough forward to get remotely close to any stock Norton set up...
     
  8. Petersen

    Petersen

    Joined:
    May 2, 2014
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2018
    Hortons Norton likes this.
  9. Fast Eddie

    Fast Eddie VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2013
    I think you’re being rather polite...

    And I agree !
     
  10. acotrel

    acotrel

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    With the featherbed frame, when fitting any motor other than a big single, you always have the problem of something hitting the front frame tubes when you try to get the motor far enough forward and down. 'Fitting the best motor in the best frame gives you the best bike' is great in theory, but in practice it is often not so easy. The Mk3 Seeley frame is very good in this respect - the open front usually allows the motor to be where it needs to be to get decent handling. I like featherbed frames - the best Period 3 historic bike, is the two-valve JAWA engine in a featherbed - cheap and effective.
     
  11. Bernhard

    Bernhard

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011
  12. Denis J

    Denis J

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2019
    Ironhead engine is 21 lbs lighter that the Evo. FYI
     
  13. ashman

    ashman

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2010
    Not sure how a heavy iron head sportster engine can be lighter than a alloy sportster engine, iron is way heavier than alloy, as well I am doing up a 79 Super Glide and I can tell you that motor is heavier than my mate's Evo motor when I helped him put it in.

    Ashley
     
  14. Denis J

    Denis J

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2019
    Its not common sense
    But I found out why
    The transmission and flywheel and rod kit is very heavy on an ally sporty. It was a hot debate in the XL forum. I weighed both. All the versions of iron motor were lighter. Partly why an evo bike is overall heavier too. My 70 XLH is 448 dry on my scale. My 03 is 503 dry. Buddies 04 1200 is 538 dry..another example of factory specs being off the mark.
     
  15. Bernhard

    Bernhard

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011
    ashman likes this.
  16. norton bob

    norton bob

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2013
    A pal of mine has built a Norcati with an 860 GTS motor. It looks very ungainly but apparently rides ok. Cannot see how it improves on the Ducati frame. Pointless.
     
    Fast Eddie likes this.
  17. Fast Eddie

    Fast Eddie VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2013
    Ex-bloody-actly !
     
    Hortons Norton likes this.
  18. Onder

    Onder

    Joined:
    May 11, 2010
    Yes but. If you build a custom bike one of the reasons is to have a bike nobody else has. It is just for the fun of doing it.
     
  19. Fast Eddie

    Fast Eddie VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2013
    That’s all true if building a pure ‘custom’ ie no functional intent behind it. Just art for arts sake.

    If wanting to claim it’s a ‘special’ there has to be some kind of reason / excuse behind the engineering.

    But generally speaking, any ‘special’ that uses a modern sporty bike engine inserted into an old chassis as a way of ‘tuning’ the old bike is a fail, cos almost always the real result will simply be a de-tuning of the modern donor bikes handling and braking potential !
     

Share This Page