Norton Commando 1969 timing issues

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Hi everyone
So received the ignition last week along with the oil switch and other parts.
Was installing the banjo bolt for the new switch and it wouldn't go in. It turns out there was one of those helicoil inside which came out with the bolt. So yesterday took the timing cover to a welder and at home was able to drill it and tap it with the titanium bolt.
Assembled the new ignition and timed it 31 degrees. Place a bit of gas inside both barrels like you guys taught me.
tickled both carbs and kicked and guess what she fired up second kick :D
It turns out it was the bad ignition all along plus the T140 boyer didn't work either previously on the bike even though it gave good spark :confused:
Also checked the alternator rotor previously and the marks were correct.
The downside of this all is that I had the center stand on top of a wooden board to free the rear wheel and with the kicking it moved and the bike drooped on the floor like in slow motion. Luckily didn't had the gas tank on and the left foot peg took all the damage and gain a bit of a bend. Also got a small mark on the speedometer bezel but the pipes and everything else were unarmed.

Have two questions regarding the S type pipes, is it normal to be so close to the side cover? and also the fuel line is really close or even touching the barrel, can't it melt the?

Anyway just wanna to thank everyone for the help and patience! wouldn't of done without all the support. In the end we pushed through :)

Cheers
Congratulations on getting a runner. Regards the fuel line, is it the "H" type? Lots of folks don't like those due to the cross over tube being near the head.
26eb61748d132119d3d9943d3d52912d.jpg
 

L.A.B.

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Congratulations on getting a runner. Regards the fuel line, is it the "H" type? Lots of folks don't like those due to the cross over tube being near the head.
26eb61748d132119d3d9943d3d52912d.jpg
Congratulations on getting a runner. Regards the fuel line, is it the "H" type? Lots of folks don't like those due to the cross over tube being near the head.
26eb61748d132119d3d9943d3d52912d.jpg
Thanks Peavey!
Yes it's an H type but I assembled myself and placed in line filter as well. but probably I can short it a little to move it away from the barrels. Don't want the bike catching on fire after all this work :)
 
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DogT

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Great on getting it running. I used my bike for years with the H type line and never had any problems, but with the latest rebuild I went to the newer lines. You'll have to buy new 'T's for the carbs for the new lines.

Yes, the pipes are very close to the side covers. If you let them get loose at all they will beat the covers, plus the 1/2" iso nylock nut to death. Keep an eye on the dog leg bracket that it doesn't crack and things are staying tight. I didn't and had a lot of issues with the pipes beating on the panels and the iso nut. I was young and stupid(er?), and didn't have much money to throw at it then either. The heat shields will fall off after about 4000 miles too if not cared for. It's not the best exhaust system out there for ease of maintenance. There is an alternative method of mounting the system if you would like to have it, I'll post it.

I've dropped mine in slow motion also, nothing to be proud of or to worry about either. Just an experience. At least unlike a Harley, one guy can usually pick it up. But at my age now I doubt it, maybe 10 years ago, OK.

Oh, and also get something like the 'Moose' clamps for the headers to the silencers. It helps.
 

Fast Eddie

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Great result! It’s always good to hear the stories end.

I can’t comment on your pipe question but ref your fuel pipe: having it touch the barrel does not sound like a good idea, especially not knowing exactly what kind of pipe you’re using, I would definitely re route this.
 
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Great on getting it running. I used my bike for years with the H type line and never had any problems, but with the latest rebuild I went to the newer lines. You'll have to buy new 'T's for the carbs for the new lines.

Yes, the pipes are very close to the side covers. If you let them get loose at all they will beat the covers, plus the 1/2" iso nylock nut to death. Keep an eye on the dog leg bracket that it doesn't crack and things are staying tight. I didn't and had a lot of issues with the pipes beating on the panels and the iso nut. I was young and stupid(er?), and didn't have much money to throw at it then either. The heat shields will fall off after about 4000 miles too if not cared for. It's not the best exhaust system out there for ease of maintenance. There is an alternative method of mounting the system if you would like to have it, I'll post it.

I've dropped mine in slow motion also, nothing to be proud of or to worry about either. Just an experience. At least unlike a Harley, one guy can usually pick it up. But at my age now I doubt it, maybe 10 years ago, OK.

Oh, and also get something like the 'Moose' clamps for the headers to the silencers. It helps.
Thanks :) I would love to see pictures of alternatives for the exhaust mounts please. Regarding the heat shields what do you mean to care for the heat shields? re-tight them from time to time?
The bike was easy to pick up but that center stand is not to be trusted. Almost got out of balance again when the kick-start bounced back
 
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Great result! It’s always good to hear the stories end.

I can’t comment on your pipe question but ref your fuel pipe: having it touch the barrel does not sound like a good idea, especially not knowing exactly what kind of pipe you’re using, I would definitely re route this.
Thanks Eddie
I will change the banjo bolts and re-route the hoses. The ones I got were the clear ones. At the time I wanted them similar to the original ones.
 
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Dunno the type of mainstand , but can wear stops & or wrench frame lugs , leaping around with it on the stand . ticularly the side stand , thought Id mention it .
On the side , you can leave it down , lift the bike vetical , start , then re lean onto it. Maybe .
The intresting part is when with the big long later one , you go into a long left hand turn . Or try to , as the side stands down .
Easier at night. Maybe flouro paint . ' Side Stand Lights , caught a new kwakersiki rider out yelling ' Your side stand lights on ' He checked that & the side a few times before he realised he didnt have one !
Good enough to wave & smile in reply . Back then the magazines were " whatever Next ? sidestand lights ! ? .
 

DogT

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No problems here with the center stand, but it's hardly ever been used, I bought the bike without one and put it on later. If you, like me, have trouble getting it on the center stand, run the front tire up on a 2x4, it makes it easier to get the bike on the stand. I lack the strength to pull the bike up.

As far as the heat shields, yes, they do work loose quickly. Keep an eye on them, it should be a weekly if not more inspection.

As far as the alternative method of mounting the exhaust system, I have this from an old post, either from this forum or britiron, don't remember and hope I don't offend anyone using their post, I just copied and pasted to a txt.

"I had a problem with my exhaust mount rubbers shearing after low mileage after I mounted a set of "S" pipes on my '70 Roadster. The original design of the rear mount looks too weak to me with just two rubber mounts holding both pipes. I worked up a new mounting system as follows: I used two stud-bolts (I used 2 Norton P/N 06-4688 studs (5/16x24) I had lying around) threaded one each into the mounting bosses on the two mufflers, then installed the flat bracket that holds the two mufflers together, then secured these brackets to the mufflers with backing nuts making a rigid assembly of the two mufflers. I then made a "sandwich" of rubber isolators over the two studs using a combination of Norton tank mounting rubber washers (06-0648) and drilled-out center rubbers from the original rubber mountings. Then fit the ends of the studs through the chrome "L" bracket with more rubber washers on the far side (need smaller OD washers here to fit inside the "U" shape - had to go search the hardware store to find some), then secured with flat washers and self-locking nuts.

This has worked well so far; the two stud bolts provide more strength for vertical shear forces from the weight of the mufflers. I have been careful not to tighten the lock-nuts too tight and not over- compress the rubber "sandwich" as the exhaust system needs some flexibility to vibrate with the engine independently of the frame.

This needs to be tight to keep the support, just not too tight. Hope this helps."

I never tried it, it's up to you. It's a process to tighten up the whole exhuaust assembly and make it stress free. Proper (not original) exhaust to silencer clamps help.
 
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No problems here with the center stand, but it's hardly ever been used, I bought the bike without one and put it on later. If you, like me, have trouble getting it on the center stand, run the front tire up on a 2x4, it makes it easier to get the bike on the stand. I lack the strength to pull the bike up.

As far as the heat shields, yes, they do work loose quickly. Keep an eye on them, it should be a weekly if not more inspection.

As far as the alternative method of mounting the exhaust system, I have this from an old post, either from this forum or britiron, don't remember and hope I don't offend anyone using their post, I just copied and pasted to a txt.

"I had a problem with my exhaust mount rubbers shearing after low mileage after I mounted a set of "S" pipes on my '70 Roadster. The original design of the rear mount looks too weak to me with just two rubber mounts holding both pipes. I worked up a new mounting system as follows: I used two stud-bolts (I used 2 Norton P/N 06-4688 studs (5/16x24) I had lying around) threaded one each into the mounting bosses on the two mufflers, then installed the flat bracket that holds the two mufflers together, then secured these brackets to the mufflers with backing nuts making a rigid assembly of the two mufflers. I then made a "sandwich" of rubber isolators over the two studs using a combination of Norton tank mounting rubber washers (06-0648) and drilled-out center rubbers from the original rubber mountings. Then fit the ends of the studs through the chrome "L" bracket with more rubber washers on the far side (need smaller OD washers here to fit inside the "U" shape - had to go search the hardware store to find some), then secured with flat washers and self-locking nuts.

This has worked well so far; the two stud bolts provide more strength for vertical shear forces from the weight of the mufflers. I have been careful not to tighten the lock-nuts too tight and not over- compress the rubber "sandwich" as the exhaust system needs some flexibility to vibrate with the engine independently of the frame.

This needs to be tight to keep the support, just not too tight. Hope this helps."

I never tried it, it's up to you. It's a process to tighten up the whole exhuaust assembly and make it stress free. Proper (not original) exhaust to silencer clamps help.
Thanks.
I was able to put a coulpe of washers and now the pipes are no longer touching the side cover
 
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