Commando Quarter Mile Times (2014)

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Here is a Dunstall 810 test from '71:

CWNortonDunstallCommando.jpg


1972 Cycle Guide Comparo. Much closer to the H2 than the CB750 is to the Commando:

CG1972Comparo1.jpg


CG1972Comparo2.jpg


'67 Dunstall Atlas:

CW67NortonDunstallAtlas.jpg


'74 Interstate... Note the weight. It was an interstate though

CW1974Commando.jpg


1974 H2, same magazine, same year...

CycleH210-74.jpg


1970 Cycle Comparison:

Cheater.jpg
 
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Interesting comparison chart. Judging by the weights, I'm guessing the BSA and Triumph are triples and not twins, which would be right around 400#'s or less. Again by weight the Harley is probably a 900cc Sportster.
 
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htown16 said:
Interesting comparison chart. Judging by the weights, I'm guessing the BSA and Triumph are triples and not twins, which would be right around 400#'s or less. Again by weight the Harley is probably a 900cc Sportster.

Judging by the speed the BSA and Triumph were triples in the 1970 comparison. The Kawasaki was an H1.

The 1972 Comparison is sans BSA. The Kawasaki is an H2. Notice that the Sportster beats the Honda. Back them ALL Hondas got slower every year. Even CBX got slower every year. Its also cool how quick the Dunstall 810 was. Somewhere I have a Cycle World test of a Norvil production racer. It was also very fast.
 
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Nater_Potater said:
wakeup said:
I'm still amazed that HD can appear to get away with what they get away with.
cheers
wakeup
It's a matter of pride, albeit arguably misdirected. HD is one of the older manufacturers around, they're employee owned, and they're made in America (the Mid-West, no less). While I'm not offering this as an excuse, understand that there's a lot of home pride surrounding the HD marquee. Unfortunately, this also tends to cultivate a considerable amount of arrogance. It's because of this attitude of most HD owners that I've chosen to distance myself from their world over here. They really tend to snub their noses at you. That, and the antiquated design, the rear cylinder is mounted backwards so it has to be fed extra fuel just to keep it from going into melt-down, the split rod design that likes to toss its cookies at anything over 5000 rpm, everything HD-related is at least 50% more expensive than it should be...

I met a Harley owner who joked that HD stands for "Hundred Dollars", since that's what's constantly flowing out of his hands to the bike shop. 'Nuf said.

Nathan
Yeah, unfortunately for the Harley faithful, their bikes are at least 15%, some would say 45% made in other countries. Much of that is China, ( horrors, by Commies!). They are assembled in the US. They are no different than any other large vehicle manufacturing company these days, parts are sourced all around the world. It's a money thing.
 

ILLF8ED

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I was in the market for a Honda CB750 in 1972. Dealers were selling them for $1295. When I was ready to buy in early 1973 the price had gone up closer to what is shown above. I ended up buying a ‘72 combat roadster with 300 miles on the odometer for $1200. That was the end of any ownership of a Japanese road bike for me up to the present. Many Nortons of various models, Triumphs, BSAs, Ducati and one current modern Sportster.
 
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