961 Clutch ?

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Depending on price obviously I would be interested in a couple. I think what you need to do is pick a realistic number to have made, say 20, then get a costing for that many. Once you have a price you can get firm order because without some sort of an idea people will be reluctant to express interest.
 

BritTwit

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Just a thought.
All fine and dandy to have a new re-designed clutch, but how exactly do you know that this clutch will not have defects?
Will it be tested extensively prior to sale to prove it is reliable?
Will we be told how it was tested, and how it performed, compared to the original failure prone units?
Let's take a different, perhaps more realistic approach to this problem.
How about a re-manufacturing option.
We obviously know the short comings of the clutches, witness Nikoli's posts, so should be easy to develop a repair process for the units.
This is just a rough template for the process:

1. Examine the unit that is removed from the engine for obvious problems.
2. Remove the ring gear from the clutch assembly
3. Remove the primary gear from the clutch basket.
4. Remove the springs from the basket.
5. Clean and check basket for damage, proceed if all is ok.
6. Procure and install proper spec/quality cush hub springs, then test movement and clearances.
7. Re-rivet basket to primary gear using proper spec rivets, then test movement and clearances.
6. Check ring gear for counter sink holes and sizes/spacing. If ok proceed, if not fix or drill new proper spec holes in ring gear.
7. Bolt and torque ring gear to basket using proper size/spec bolts. Apply loctite for added degree of insurance.

As Nigel stated earlier, the working process of a motorcycle clutch is nothing new. Attention to quality control is something that was in short supply at Norton. Breaking down the stock clutch and building it back up with the proper components/processes/skills would probably yield a reliable unit.
 
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I'm trying to get a feel to see what serious interest is out there to see if this is something to pursue.
I haven't yet come to a quantity figure until I could gauge the response, and then I would have to complete is costing study.
Personally I think the £800each figure from Norton is very steep, and from my own experience Bikers don't like paying out money very easily.
So I need to look at a realistic target sale figure, and then see based on interest how many items we would require to be viable against tooling cost.
I was hoping that by now I would have had some proper data on quantity, but other than you, I haven't had much solid feed back.
Did you have a quantity in mind ?
I would be looking at Qty. 1
 

cliffa

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Just a thought.
All fine and dandy to have a new re-designed clutch, but how exactly do you know that this clutch will not have defects?
Will it be tested extensively prior to sale to prove it is reliable?
Will we be told how it was tested, and how it performed, compared to the original failure prone units?
Let's take a different, perhaps more realistic approach to this problem.
How about a re-manufacturing option.
We obviously know the short comings of the clutches, witness Nikoli's posts, so should be easy to develop a repair process for the units.
This is just a rough template for the process:

1. Examine the unit that is removed from the engine for obvious problems.
2. Remove the ring gear from the clutch assembly
3. Remove the primary gear from the clutch basket.
4. Remove the springs from the basket.
5. Clean and check basket for damage, proceed if all is ok.
6. Procure and install proper spec/quality cush hub springs, then test movement and clearances.
7. Re-rivet basket to primary gear using proper spec rivets, then test movement and clearances.
6. Check ring gear for counter sink holes and sizes/spacing. If ok proceed, if not fix or drill new proper spec holes in ring gear.
7. Bolt and torque ring gear to basket using proper size/spec bolts. Apply loctite for added degree of insurance.

As Nigel stated earlier, the working process of a motorcycle clutch is nothing new. Attention to quality control is something that was in short supply at Norton. Breaking down the stock clutch and building it back up with the proper components/processes/skills would probably yield a reliable unit.
The problem is that if a major part of it (as In the picture above) has failed will you be able to get replacement parts from Norton ?
 

BritTwit

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The problem is that if a major part of it (as In the picture above) has failed will you be able to get replacement parts from Norton ?
Food for thought.
If the V4 has a reliable clutch, how about building a version modified to fit the 961?
Design is basically done for the V4, part will be a standard V4 part with slight re-machining requirements.
So no need to design/engineer a whole new part.
The basket would need to be modded to accept the 961 primary gear, starter ring, basket bearing, etc.
And already we know it can handle 200HP, so no worries about popping rivets, fractured springs, or other components.
 
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