Swing arm and engine cradle removal

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Hi everyone just stripping my 68 Commando to get the frame work done, an hit a bit of a stop getting the engine cradle / swing arm free of the frame.

Got to this point. Whats the next step guys?

The lower frame rail with the centre stand stops it dropping down an the vernier iso is to wide for it to pull back. Am I right in saying the swingarm has to come off or am I missing a trick?

Thanks in advance :)


 

Fast Eddie

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Take the wheel and shocks off etc and you should be able to pull it backwards at an angle IIRC.

Also, having come this far, it would be good to double check the swing arm spindle and bush condition...
 
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Cheers Eddie I'll have a go at that now an grab a second pair of hands. Yep gonna do that its got modern bearings in the headstock
 
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If memory serves, which could be an issue, you do have to remove the swing arm with the earlier frame and vernier isolastics combination.
Mike B
 

Derek Wilson

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Take the wheel & shocks off, and also take the nuts off of your isolastics. I typically build bikes with the cradle and swing arm pre-assembled and have never hit a problem getting it in or out.
 
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Legend thanks mate came out really easily was a statment someone made a few years back that was confusing me
 

marshg246

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As others have said, it will come out with the swingarm attached and since the engine/gearbox are not installed, it's pretty easy.

I am too weak these days to get the engine out of the cradle with the cradle in the frame by myself. So, I remove the swingarm, lay the bike on it's side, remove the front isolastic, and the rear isolastic stud. It easy then to remove the frame.

When going back together, I put the engine and gearbox in the cradle (without the primary) lay them on the timing side, put the frame over them and install the rear isolastic stud. Then with padding between the engine and frame, stand it up and install the front isolastic. Finally, I install the swing arm.

Both in removing and reinstalling this way, there is less chance of damaging paint. I can use my engine hoist to move the power unit and I am still strong enough to move the engine itself by hand to put it in the power unit.
 

Derek Wilson

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As others have said, it will come out with the swingarm attached and since the engine/gearbox are not installed, it's pretty easy.

I am too weak these days to get the engine out of the cradle with the cradle in the frame by myself. So, I remove the swingarm, lay the bike on it's side, remove the front isolastic, and the rear isolastic stud. It easy then to remove the frame.

When going back together, I put the engine and gearbox in the cradle (without the primary) lay them on the timing side, put the frame over them and install the rear isolastic stud. Then with padding between the engine and frame, stand it up and install the front isolastic. Finally, I install the swing arm.

Both in removing and reinstalling this way, there is less chance of damaging paint. I can use my engine hoist to move the power unit and I am still strong enough to move the engine itself by hand to put it in the power unit.
That is good to know - may have to try that method.

I have a lift bench with a wheel vise and a frame stand. The stand holds the frame by the lower cradle tubes at about center stand height.

I start with the frame on the stand, strapped to the bench. I install the front end and front wheel, then clamp the wheel in the wheel vise. This makes the frame very stable.

I then put the engine in with the front isolastic installed, with padding underneath to protect the frame.

Next I install the swing arm and cradle as one assembly from the rear and put in the top bolt to the engine and the rear isolastic spindle.

The transmission goes in next, and then the last two engine bolts.

Then the head steady goes on, and the power unit is in.
 
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Thanks everyone :) a second pair of hands an The cradle + swinger came out with the shocks n wheel removed forward direction with a slight twisting motion as eddie said. Great to hear the different methods gonna check those swing arm bushes out to while shes all apart.
 

baz

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Thanks everyone :) a second pair of hands an The cradle + swinger came out with the shocks n wheel removed forward direction with a slight twisting motion as eddie said. Great to hear the different methods gonna check those swing arm bushes out to while shes all apart.
When you check the swing arm bushings also check the fit of the pin I the gearbox cradle
There are various fixes for this but the common one seems to be the Kegler clamps
Plenty of info about these on here
Cheers
 

gortnipper

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Do the Kegler clamps. Inexpensive and a very worthwhile mod.

 

gortnipper

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If you get a new spindle from AN, they have the fixing bolt hole in the top, and flats for the MK3 cotter pins (there is only one replacement spindle now for all models IIRC).

The bolt on top centers the spindle, and the bolt on the back of the split collars onto the spindle flats pins the spindle in the cradle tube.

Add new bushes and seals (which are likely shot). No more wallowing out.
 
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If you have the swing arm out of the frame and are going to dismantle further you can simply drill a couple if holes in the swing arm spindle tube and weld a couple of nuts on the tube to accomodate a couple of bolts with lock nuts. I've done this a few times with good results.
 
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If you have the swing arm out of the frame and are going to dismantle further you can simply drill a couple if holes in the swing arm spindle tube and weld a couple of nuts on the tube to accommodate a couple of bolts with lock nuts. I've done this a few times with good results.
I agree with Dave M. The Kegler clamp method is only needed for situations where you are not disassembling the bike. In post #12, Gortnipper shows a photo of an 850 Mk II style swing arm. Note the gussets just behind the cross bar. You can buy those gussets, cheaply, from Andover Norton (P/N 06-4540). Weld them in while the bike is apart, to improve handling. See

https://andover-norton.co.uk/en/shop-details/15269/swinging-arm-without-gusset-
 

concours

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I contend the tubing is too thin and will deform with nuts welded on and tightened enough to be effective. Kegler shaft collar is better fix.
43 years in the metal trade.
 
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Concours +1, the welded nuts will remove the current play from the tube being distorted but the tube is still too thin and will continue to distort. The clamps stop the tube from distorting full stop.
 

marshg246

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Just wondering if people keep the horn in the normal place when using the Kegler clamps.
 
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