1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Pre Season Checks

Discussion in 'Norton Motorcycles (Modern)' started by Rob Jameson - Norton UK, Feb 20, 2019.

  1. Z1000elderado

    Z1000elderado

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2018
    It goes into a little plastic bottle on behind the left hand side foot controls and comes from the airbox, mine was not fitted when the bike arrived but is fitted now
     
    David Hales likes this.
  2. David Hales

    David Hales

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2018
    I havnt got one, pipes just discharge to the floor, I have two pipes different sizes, both appear to have a bit of oil on them
     
  3. Eljahara

    Eljahara VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2018
    David
    Check your air box then, the bottle is a fix for oil pooling in the air box.
    John
     
  4. Eljahara

    Eljahara VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2018
    B15F34D6-8EA7-4F21-8426-23E9DE5A8065.jpeg 6A832D88-50A5-4271-992F-DA22147D4D76.jpeg Looking for some advice -
    Took the bike out of the garage, started up fine but the rear wheel is covered in a “white dust” attempts to polish off leave little black specs.
    I suspect a rusting/oxidation butthese are polished chrome wheels - the rest of the chrome is fine
    Suggestions/fixes.
    John
     

    Attached Files:

  5. MxMartin

    MxMartin

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2017
    John, wheels will be polished alloy and your dust would be corrosion from humidity and quite possibly salt. The little black specs are pits in the alloy, you might be lucky and be able to polish them out but the deeper pits are there to stay. Mine started to do that from the first month of ownership, I did cry a little at first but now I just polish them back the best I can. Give it a few years and I may well get mine powder coated to cover up the mess.
     
  6. MxMartin

    MxMartin

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2017
    Oddly it didn't, I suspect my gauge might be telling fibs In which case they are now too high lol
     
  7. Eljahara

    Eljahara VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2018
    Thanks Mark
    I didn’t run it with salt on the roads and ALL the rest of the chrome, including the front wheel is fine and shiny - disappointed at rust on some of the spokes too!
    Really difficult to get off the wheel, what did you use?
    John
     
  8. MxMartin

    MxMartin

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2017
    John, yes my front wheel is still in pretty decent shape too as are the other polished parts. I just used an aluminium polishing paste like Solvol on a cloth and lots of elbow grease. I now make a point of cleaning my back wheel regularly, probably more regularly than the rest of the bike, it's a pain in the ass!
     
  9. MxMartin

    MxMartin

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2017
    John, my memory is refreshing a little... my corrosion was much like yours (the first time) and a polishing paste wasn't any good as it was too dry so I made up a soapy solution and used an old dishwashing scourer, those sponges with the green nylon scourer on one side, and that left a good enough finish for me to then use Solvol on a rag to polish. Since the first experience I now just use Solvol/rag each time.
     
    Eljahara likes this.
  10. BritTwit

    BritTwit VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    There are two ways of removing aluminum corrosion that I've used:

    1. For really serious corrosion/pitting, get an aluminum etching cleaner. the name says it all. The cleaner will chemically combine with the corrosion, loosen it and allow you to wash it off the wheel. It usually produces a foam that cleans off easily. The downside is that you will actually be removing aluminum from the surface of the wheel. Also, you'll need to polish the rim when done.

    2. The best way to remove the corrosion is to use an alloy mag wheel polish, a high grade polish like Mothers. Leave the Mothers polish on the rim for 10-15 minutes, then get a hand drill and a mag wheel polishing/buffing wheel. The buffing wheel will clean the rims nicely, and also your wire spokes, and nipples. Buffing does remove a bit of aluminum from the surface, but less than an etching cleaner. Letting the drill do the work, you won't have carpel tunnel syndrome afterwards. Another plus to this method, you get to use a power tool.

    If you polish the wheel periodically, each polishing session will be quick and easy.
     
    Eljahara likes this.
  11. Eljahara

    Eljahara VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2018
    Thanks
    Helpful, so you are with Mark - Corrosion?
    Seems weird, none of the alloys on any car I have ever owned have done this
    John
     
  12. Fredvincent

    Fredvincent

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2018
    I always use ACF50 on spoked rims. It is good for disimilar metals i.e. rim to spoke nipple. I use a cut down old paint brush to apply onto the rims and the spoke nipples. Belgum Alu is good on polished alloy during the summer.
     
    Accnor73 likes this.
  13. BritTwit

    BritTwit VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Some polished alloys are coated with clear acrylics, or powder coated to prevent corrosion.
    But bare alloy will corrode/pit, even if you don't ride in wet weather.
    I live in NYC near the coast and corrosion is always a problem.

    In winter months, the city dumps enormous amounts of salt on the roads here.
    This blows in the wind, and with even a little humidity in the air, will easily stick to vehicle surfaces.
    If left in place, the salt can do tremendous damage before it's detected.
    This is why I drastically limit my winter riding.
    If the weather is warm, and the roads have been clear of ice or snow for a few weeks, I'll ride.
    Otherwise, the bike stays in the barn.

    I don't like constantly cleaning/polishing surfaces, but the alternative is far more risky.
     
  14. holtcorseaux

    holtcorseaux VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2016
    That‘s so funny Nigel! It took me a while to getit. My wife wanted to know why I was laughing but literally cannot understand it. What‘s a rim? What‘s a matron? Oh...What‘s so funny about that?

    Thank you

    Martin.
     
  15. Eljahara

    Eljahara VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2018
    Thanks
    I remember why I have avoided spoked wheels up to this point!
    I will give a clean tomorrow -too dark here now
    Kinda upsets the resale value too...
    Cheers
    John
     
  16. BritTwit

    BritTwit VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    There is nothing more beautiful on a classic motorcycle or sports car as laced wire wheels.
    And nothing requiring more maintenance either.
    i.e. Spoke tightening, rim truing, laborious cleaning.

    I wished that Norton would have offered a classically styled mag wheel for the 961 like the old Morris mags from the 70's.
    No maintenance, no inner tubes, silly easy cleaning (hose spray), and 90 degree air nipples for easy filling.
    The old mags came in different finishes, polished alloy, gold, gun metal, black.


    [​IMG]Hosted on Fotki
     
    MxMartin likes this.
  17. MxMartin

    MxMartin

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2017
    I'm 99.9% sure your wheel is salt corrosion, just like mine was. I'm about 20 miles from the coast and pretty sure the easterly breeze has enough salt in it without having to worry about what the council put on the roads, then condensation collects overnight so it's like a mild acid bath. I haven't a clue why it's the rear wheel that suffers while the rest of the bikes polished alloy remains clean, maybe someone from the factory can provide some insight. I did wonder at first if it was something in the chain lube that Norton use. Which reminds me, my chain rapidly corrodes as well so I clean and lube it as often as I clean the rear wheel... which is about 4x more frequent than the rest of the bike!

    Love the wheels Brit! I have these on my 80's Sportster but they also have diamond cut rims so I still have to apply a little polish to mine.
     
    Eljahara likes this.
  18. Eljahara

    Eljahara VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2018
    Thanks Mark,
    Will try and clean them up tomorrow - tried the “vinegar remedy” - load of ball cocks
    Cleaning chemicals are the only way....
    John
     
  19. Fast Eddie

    Fast Eddie VIP MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2013
    I’d use solvo and scotchbrite pads and go for the ‘brushed alloy’ look.

    And keep ‘em protected with ACF50, WD40 or ‘Rimwax’ as sold by central wheels.
     
    Eljahara likes this.
  20. Accnor73

    Accnor73

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2018
    This is my ‘longer’ dipstick that was fitted at the last dealer service. Where should the oil be on this one, in the knurled section? Thanks

    [​IMG]
     

Share This Page