Commando folklore (2017)

cliffa

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My pleasure toppy. Actually it was much easier the second time around, as i could use the original as a pattern.

If anybody is interested in copying it feel free. It's 2mm rust free steel alloy ( part of a piece of handrail tube I had leftover). The larger hole is 13.75mm, and the smaller 6.25mm. The distance between centres (centers for you folks new to English :D) is 17mm. The slot for the cable is 3mm.


cheers,

cliffa
 

robs ss

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I have the same switch but I mounted my bracket to one of the foot peg bolts and not on the cable, works the same as yours, I replace my switch for a early Honda switch as the new replacement switches seem to fall apart as I replaced 2 in less than a year, not as good quility as the orginal switch.

Ashley
Ash - what is the switch you use?
 

concours

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IIRC, all those old plunger switches on Jap bikes were mounted vertically. Pretty sure that was not accidentally.
JMWO
 

Carl H

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Ash - what is the switch you use?
One thing about any brand of the old original type switch is you have to be sure the pedal stop is adjusted so the switch does not take the strain ( force) of the pedal when it returns. . My only problem with the design is the mounting plate and they get damaged over the years and can break off or get damaged in tip overs of the bike itself. .
 
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Well done!
Of course the real question has to be (and this is serious), what was the designer thinking, putting the switch on the pedal in the first place, not to mention the appalling quality of the actual components. The very fact that we are discussing redesigning such a basic and simple part of a the bike must indicate a short coming in the design and management structure.
Obviously a design engineer was allocated the task of designing a stop light setup and for God only knows reason thought this was the best solution. He then drew it up and submitted for approval. It then went into production. How could it be that someone in the chain didn’t look at it and say, ‘this is crap, have another go’.
Brake light switches have been in use forever, numerous cars successfully use pedal switches (as opposed to hydraulic switches). All work perfectly and none have the switch and associated wiring on the pedal. Surely the cost of welding the slotted switch bracket onto the brake lever and then having to adjust the switch to the correct position during manufacture would have been greater than the simple solution that every Honda used from ‘step through’ up to 750/4, similar to what you have designed.
And this does not even address the problem that the switch itself is junk and the rubber boot perishes very quickly. At least with Triumph , the same junky switch is attached to the frame not the lever. I’ve been battling with this component since the 1970. When I reregistered my Commando a few weeks ago, though I thought it was perfect, guess what the only electrical item that didn’t work at the rego check was?

As a bit of a pommie tragic with cars and bikes I find I’m very interested in the philosophy, history and design of British products and their decline from industry leaders to ‘also rans’ in such a short period. I do understand the crippling economic cost of victory in two world wars in their difficulties in retooling for new designs but it doesn’t explain just plain bad engineering.
Please don’t take this as a criticism of our bikes, just a cry of anguish as how they could get some bits so wrong.

As an aside, it is interesting comparing the build quality and engineering of my 1965 Rootes Group Humber Imperial (glorified Super Snipe) and my 1979 Daimler (Jag) Double Six (V12). Whilst regarded as frumpy and unexciting, the Humber is just so much better built, reliable and honest, although a cheaper car.
 

cliffa

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Well done!
Of course the real question has to be (and this is serious), what was the designer thinking, putting the switch on the pedal in the first place, not to mention the appalling quality of the actual components. The very fact that we are discussing redesigning such a basic and simple part of a the bike must indicate a short coming in the design and management structure.
Obviously a design engineer was allocated the task of designing a stop light setup and for God only knows reason thought this was the best solution. He then drew it up and submitted for approval. It then went into production. How could it be that someone in the chain didn’t look at it and say, ‘this is crap, have another go’.
Brake light switches have been in use forever, numerous cars successfully use pedal switches (as opposed to hydraulic switches). All work perfectly and none have the switch and associated wiring on the pedal. Surely the cost of welding the slotted switch bracket onto the brake lever and then having to adjust the switch to the correct position during manufacture would have been greater than the simple solution that every Honda used from ‘step through’ up to 750/4, similar to what you have designed.
And this does not even address the problem that the switch itself is junk and the rubber boot perishes very quickly. At least with Triumph , the same junky switch is attached to the frame not the lever. I’ve been battling with this component since the 1970. When I reregistered my Commando a few weeks ago, though I thought it was perfect, guess what the only electrical item that didn’t work at the rego check was?

As a bit of a pommie tragic with cars and bikes I find I’m very interested in the philosophy, history and design of British products and their decline from industry leaders to ‘also rans’ in such a short period. I do understand the crippling economic cost of victory in two world wars in their difficulties in retooling for new designs but it doesn’t explain just plain bad engineering.
Please don’t take this as a criticism of our bikes, just a cry of anguish as how they could get some bits so wrong.

As an aside, it is interesting comparing the build quality and engineering of my 1965 Rootes Group Humber Imperial (glorified Super Snipe) and my 1979 Daimler (Jag) Double Six (V12). Whilst regarded as frumpy and unexciting, the Humber is just so much better built, reliable and honest, although a cheaper car.
Thank you Sir, glad you like it :)

I presume that Norton couldn't afford to ask Lucas to design and manufacture another switch so had to buy parts which were available and go with those.
 
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Hi
Thank you Sir, glad you like it :)

I presume that Norton couldn't afford to ask Lucas to design and manufacture another switch so had to buy parts which were available and go with those.
Cliff,
Would Norton have been contracted to only use Lucas parts?
If a Lucas part of suitable design and quality wasn't avaliable couldn’t they have shopped elsewhere?
What was the relationship between Lucas and British car and bike manufacturer?
I had owned three or four Rover SD and Vanden Plas 3500 cars. They were magnificent comfortable and fast driving cars but ruined by switches that fell apart in your hand etc etc. How could such an old and respected brand commit public Hari Kari through self emolating electrical components worth a few cents? (Yes, I do know, it was Leyland‘s fault?)
al
 

Fast Eddie

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Lucas knew what they were doing. The issue was they were forced to the lowest absolute piece price. And then forced to reduce costs !
 
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Well done!
Of course the real question has to be (and this is serious), what was the designer thinking, putting the switch on the pedal in the first place, not to mention the appalling quality of the actual components. The very fact that we are discussing redesigning such a basic and simple part of a the bike must indicate a short coming in the design and management structure.
Obviously a design engineer was allocated the task of designing a stop light setup and for God only knows reason thought this was the best solution. He then drew it up and submitted for approval. It then went into production. How could it be that someone in the chain didn’t look at it and say, ‘this is crap, have another go’.
Brake light switches have been in use forever, numerous cars successfully use pedal switches (as opposed to hydraulic switches). All work perfectly and none have the switch and associated wiring on the pedal. Surely the cost of welding the slotted switch bracket onto the brake lever and then having to adjust the switch to the correct position during manufacture would have been greater than the simple solution that every Honda used from ‘step through’ up to 750/4, similar to what you have designed.
And this does not even address the problem that the switch itself is junk and the rubber boot perishes very quickly. At least with Triumph , the same junky switch is attached to the frame not the lever. I’ve been battling with this component since the 1970. When I reregistered my Commando a few weeks ago, though I thought it was perfect, guess what the only electrical item that didn’t work at the rego check was?

As a bit of a pommie tragic with cars and bikes I find I’m very interested in the philosophy, history and design of British products and their decline from industry leaders to ‘also rans’ in such a short period. I do understand the crippling economic cost of victory in two world wars in their difficulties in retooling for new designs but it doesn’t explain just plain bad engineering.
Please don’t take this as a criticism of our bikes, just a cry of anguish as how they could get some bits so wrong.

As an aside, it is interesting comparing the build quality and engineering of my 1965 Rootes Group Humber Imperial (glorified Super Snipe) and my 1979 Daimler (Jag) Double Six (V12). Whilst regarded as frumpy and unexciting, the Humber is just so much better built, reliable and honest, although a cheaper car.
Humber Super Snipe... First British production car to have twin headlights :)
(From a former Rapier owner and Rootes afficionado)
 

robs ss

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Well I'm going to fit a patented "cliff hanger" onto my "halfway-rearsets" - will be the perfect fit!
 

MichaelB

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Lucas knew what they were doing. The issue was they were forced to the lowest absolute piece price. And then forced toreduce costs !
Probably a lot of truth to that...unfortunately....
 
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Once again Cliffa I thankyou for sending me the wonderfully well made bracket an you may be pleased to know it is working well an much better than the original set up.
 
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