Another one lives!

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Well, getting close to the end of a 2+ year restoration I thought Id better sign up and introduce us both. Im based in Warwickshire, UK. Probably similar to most here, wanted a P11 from the first time I saw an article in an old classic bike mag. Finally found an early, matching numbers '67 P11, 1211**. Manufactured March '67 and delivered to Berliner Corp, Seattle, USA. Not all original but pretty complete. Supposedly rebuilt engine and gearbox but turned out to be a collection of parts resembling a P11 really! Its been a right old job and a bit of a money pit but I still feel worth it, particularly when I first heard it bark into life!

So, front to back. Thought we had better check fork internals, one side road, one side scrambler, seriously! Rebuilt clocks, replaced seized bearings, new bars, new brace, new mudguard, new Heidenau tyres.

Engine had new, standard pistons. On closer inspection the bores were marked and too much to hone out, so went up to +20. Head rebuilt with new valves & guides etc. The clutch basket was out of true so that was replaced. Gearbox had new seals but also thought it was worth looking inside. Glad we did, 2nd gear very rusty so that was replaced! Primary cover was de-chromed and polished.

Im lucky enough to have a mate who is into classic car restoration and his guys kindly painted the tanks and side panel to the right lacquer recipe. Ive never seen paint like it, it just glows on the sun!

Rear mudguard replaced. The swingarm had been messed with at some point so we had to make up bespoke spacers to get that right. The rear hub was also wrong so I had to source the right one with the right offset and have that re-laced. The rear drum was out of true so that was replaced!

On first start up it wasnt happy. We found that the stator was skimming the inside of the primary cover. That was fixed. It still wouldnt run and despite now being rebuilt with matching jets and needles both sides we replaced them with new carbs and that fixed it.

On the first run, all went well, right up to the point when an exhaust valve nipped up, so head off and back to the machine shop for new valve guide and valve! Next the clutch started slipping excessively. It turned out that what looked like a good clutch was starting to lose chunks of friction material. Guess what, that was replaced! The timing cover had been welded at some point. That leaked oil quite significantly, so that was also replaced!

Anyway, we are nearly there now (I hope!) Its done less than 200 miles so still running in. Hopefully, the only issue now is a significant oil leak from the disc seal on the primary.

Sorry to start with a question but if anyone has got any top tips, part numbers etc for this area Id really appreciate it. From memory I think mine had been riveted so probably messed with if the rest of the bikes anything to go by!

I think its been worth it! Its definitely a good thing to save another of this rare breed, despite the pain, and cost! Despite being gentle, running in, its a hoot to ride with the wide bars, bags of torque and that noise! The original supermoto! I tried to post a photo but I no longer use Photobucket, might be a job for later. Bear with me...
Cheers.
Paul.
 
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Welcome aboard, Paul.. Had one for 11 years and tops my 'bikes I should never have sold' list..
Hope you can get photos up..
 
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Congrats! She looks very nice, just as a P11 should be. I like the early high-pipe model better that the later ones, even though I don't own one (mine is a P11A).
Although not original, the alloy rims look purposeful on this bike.

-Knut
 
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Can you see my green eyes :) I'm guessing the prop stand is aftermarket (?) though shouldn't do the 'anorak' thing! (apologies) Mine came as a 'rolling restoration' from Randy Baxter, who thoughtfully packed all the 'good/new' bits separately... Seemed a good idea at the time 'til I got hit with import duty/VAT twice! They're a great ride if you keep standard tune and don't expect a motorway cruiser..
 
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Cheers all!
Postimage was a good tip, sorted!
Hadn’t noticed the side stand, probably because it was one of the few things that worked! It’s been and will probably continue to be a learning curve!
 

texasSlick

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Anyway, we are nearly there now (I hope!) Its done less than 200 miles so still running in. Hopefully, the only issue now is a significant oil leak from the disc seal on the primary.

Sorry to start with a question but if anyone has got any top tips, part numbers etc for this area Id really appreciate it. From memory I think mine had been riveted so probably messed with if the rest of the bikes anything to go by!

Paul.
Check this link ....> https://www.accessnorton.com/NortonCommando/how-to-make-the-atlas-dominator-primary-oil-tight.26860/

There is some info regarding the sealing discs.

Slick

PS: Nice bike!
 
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Check this link ....> https://www.accessnorton.com/NortonCommando/how-to-make-the-atlas-dominator-primary-oil-tight.26860/

There is some info regarding the sealing discs.

Slick

PS: Nice bike!
Hi Slick, many thanks for the link. This has the cast aluminium, Matchless type inner primary but I guess the principles are the same. Both the inner and the plates have been ‘modified’ at some point, hence the leak! There’s not much left of the cast shielding lip surrounding the plates and the plates have been separated and screwed back together, not as the tightest of fits! After much scratching of heads we are about to pioneer a revolutionary new concept!.... a carefully selected gauge of cord, soaked in Wellseal and wound tightly between chaincase inner and plates to take up the gap! I’m hoping to improve the leak but not completely fix it as I don’t want to be accused of it not being a real Norton! Initial test results looking positive! :)
 
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My solution to primary leaks was a Newby dry belt drive... :)
Thank you, looks like a very elegant and effective solution! I’ve already put much more than I planned into the old girl but who knows, if this doesn’t work....
 
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Why not simply obtain a 'new' inner primary cover? They are not that hard to come by. Otherwise, I have seen new sliding discs being offered (buyer to assemble). However, a usable inner cover is required ...

-Knut
 
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Why not simply obtain a 'new' inner primary cover? They are not that hard to come by. Otherwise, I have seen new sliding discs being offered (buyer to assemble). However, a usable inner cover is required ...

-Knut
Thanks Knut, that might well be the next step. I’ll try this and see how we get on whilst keeping an eye out for another chaincase inner. Fingers crossed!
 
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Thank you, looks like a very elegant and effective solution! I’ve already put much more than I planned into the old girl but who knows, if this doesn’t work....
For what it's worth, the Norvil belt drive units claim to be straight drop-in units and use a Commando style diaphragm spring; the Newby took more work to space the outer cover properly. Didn't recall the Norvil being as expensive, but I have a Newby on my other bike so it made sense for me to get another.

In any case, compare the cost of the belt drive to the cost of the new inner if/when you find one...if it obviates the need to buy a new inner cover, might be a good time to invest in the belt. (and stop spending on gaskets and oil and troublesome fiddling...)

My belt drive write up: https://www.accessnorton.com/NortonCommando/newby-clutch-installation-report-g15-cs.29138/

(I've since added a clutch seal nut, which required another steel plate in the stack to space out the clutch pack due to the nut's additional length to the mainshaft.)
 
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For what it's worth, the Norvil belt drive units claim to be straight drop-in units and use a Commando style diaphragm spring; the Newby took more work to space the outer cover properly. Didn't recall the Norvil being as expensive, but I have a Newby on my other bike so it made sense for me to get another.

In any case, compare the cost of the belt drive to the cost of the new inner if/when you find one...if it obviates the need to buy a new inner cover, might be a good time to invest in the belt. (and stop spending on gaskets and oil and troublesome fiddling...)

My belt drive write up: https://www.accessnorton.com/NortonCommando/newby-clutch-installation-report-g15-cs.29138/

(I've since added a clutch seal nut, which required another steel plate in the stack to space out the clutch pack due to the nut's additional length to the mainshaft.)
Many thanks, that’s a great source of info. I’ve just put a new clutch in so will see how things go and take it from there.
Cheers for all the inputs. :)
 

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